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A Brief History of the Streamline Moderne Movement

At Optima, we have a deep appreciation for architectural movements that have shaped our surroundings. Today, we’re taking a closer look at Streamline Moderne, an influential style born from the Art Deco movement, celebrated for its embodiment of speed, efficiency, and the modern era.

Origins of Streamline Moderne

Emerging in the 1930s, Streamline Moderne was a testament to the rapidly evolving technological landscape of the time. Influenced by aerodynamic design and born from the advancements in transportation and manufacturing, the movement represented a shift from the ornamental flourishes of Art Deco to a sleeker, more functional aesthetic. It mirrored the streamlined shapes of airplanes, ships, and automobiles, encapsulating the era’s romance with speed and progress.

Los Angeles’ Pan-Pacific Auditorium, Plummer, Wurdeman and Becket, 1935, Photo from Floyd B. Bariscale
Los Angeles’ Pan-Pacific Auditorium, Plummer, Wurdeman and Becket, 1935, Photo from Floyd B. Bariscale

Architects and designers, inspired by the sleek, aerodynamic lines of the modern machine age, began incorporating these elements into buildings, household appliances, and even consumer products. This shift marked a distinct move towards simplicity and efficiency, a response to the economic constraints of the Great Depression.

Streamline Moderne in Architecture

The Streamline Moderne movement left a profound impact with several notable examples still celebrated today. Among these, the Pan-Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles stands out with its sweeping, streamlined façade and stylized pylons, epitomizing the movement’s love for fluidity and motion.

The slew of Streamline Moderne hotels living on Miami’s Ocean Drive, Photo from State Archives of Florida

Another classic example is the Coca-Cola Building in Los Angeles. Its curved corners, elongated horizontal lines, and nautical elements like porthole windows perfectly illustrate Streamline Moderne’s aesthetic principles. These structures not only embodied the technological advancement of the era but also represented a desire for a design that was both functional and visually appealing.

In Miami, the Streamline Moderne movement found particularly fertile ground, with Ocean Drive hotels showcasing the style’s quintessential features. The smooth curves, chrome accents, and pastel colors of these buildings have become synonymous with Miami’s diverse architectural identity, drawing visitors and architecture enthusiasts from around the world.

Today, these structures stand as elegant reminders of an era captivated by the future. In Streamline Moderne, we find a celebration of simplicity, functionality, and beauty – principles that resonate with our approach at Optima. Streamline Moderne is a testament to design’s power in shaping not just buildings, but the character of entire cities and the imagination of generations to come.

Ellison Keomaka Art at 7190 Optima Kierland

Revisit the artistic genius of Ellison Keomaka, where he offers a deep dive into his vibrant creations for Optima Kierland 7190. The mixture of artwork includes a dynamic collaboration with David Hovey Sr. and features pieces that draw from his past work at Optima Lakeview and take inspiration from Alexander Calder’s famous mobile sculptures. Ready for another colorful journey with Ellison? Dive in below: 

What did the creative process entail when first conceiving and planning the artwork for Optima Kierland 7190? 

When I started by creating artwork for Optima Kierland 7190, I aimed to maintain a bold and vibrant aesthetic. The Mobiles series was the first series I did for 7190 that included the mobile likeness. As their name suggests, I took inspiration from Alexander Calder’s mobile styles and then added more of my own style with the texture and colors. Other works, like the Primary series, took inspiration from previous artwork I’ve done for Optima Lakeview.

MISC-ELE-002 by Ellison Keomaka at 7190 Optima Kierland
MISC-ELE-002 by Ellison Keomaka at 7190 Optima Kierland

What role do color and texture play in these works? 

Unlike some of my other artwork throughout the Optima Communities, all of the work I created for 7190 was done freehand with inks and paint. David Hovey Sr. has a particular affinity for bold colors, so I wanted to integrate that as a theme throughout my work. The Silhouette series is one of the boldest works I created for 7190. What makes this series stand out are the striking black backgrounds that are meant to hang on a white wall. I thought it framed the pieces well, giving the impression of a window through which you can view the colors behind.

From left to right, HYP-08 and HYP-06 by Ellison Keomaka at 7190 Optima Kierland
From left to right, HYP-08 and HYP-06 by Ellison Keomaka at 7190 Optima Kierland

You collaborated with David Hovey Sr. on one series at 7190 Optima Kierland. Can you describe this process and how these pieces differ from the other works in 7190? 

David Hovey Sr. and I bounced around several ideas in the Free Form series before landing on a style for the Celebration series. He had visited to review some pieces, and during his visit, I suggested the idea of incorporating a black line in them. As I commenced drawing the lines, we collaborated, and I created four or five smaller pieces in that style. It was a wonderful experience to work alongside David in this way. 

After sketching the lines and proposing some freeform shapes, David suggested adding some color, which we experimented with. It evolved into a fun reciprocal process that eventually yielded these vibrant pieces. These artworks blend influences from various fields, including automotive pinstriping and a touch of street art. In-person, they span 18 feet in width combined, making them quite impactful. There was no room for error with the black line, and since any adjustments would be noticeable, each piece had to be finalized in one take, freehand with inks and paint. 

L-REE-0024 by Ellison Keomaka in 7190 Optima Kierland
L-REE-0024 by Ellison Keomaka in 7190 Optima Kierland

Is there anything else we should know about the creative process for these pieces or the work itself? 

Managing the sheer volume of pieces is challenging and an art project in its own right. It requires shifting your mindset and thinking on a different scale constantly. For example, the Curiosity and Free Form series have so many individual pieces in the collection that my goal was to ensure that each stood out with its own unique look or style. So, these have been very interesting challenges that I find extremely rewarding.

Women in Architecture: Elizabeth Diller

In our ongoing “Women in Architecture” series, we’re highlighting Elizabeth Diller, a visionary who turns metaphors into brick and mortar and continues to challenge conventional architecture. 

The Life of Elizabeth Diller

Elizabeth Diller was born in 1954 in Łódź, Poland, and moved with her parents, who were Holocaust survivors, to the United States when she was six. She was deeply affected by the social unrest of the late 1960s, which ultimately led her to enroll in the Cooper Union School of Architecture in 1970 which, at the time, was a creative hotbed and home to avant-garde design.

Initially, Elizabeth intended to pursue art or filmmaking, but ultimately found herself captivated by alternative methods of space-making. Even then, she was much more interested in the East Village music and art scene than in her classes. It wasn’t until Elizabeth met one of Cooper Union’s design professors, Ricardo Scofidio, that she became fully invested in design. After graduation, Diller and Scofidio became both romantic and creative partners, and emerged as prominent conceptual artists, focusing on comically dark design hacks and advancing the idea that “anything can be architecture” in their 1994 book, Flesh. This conceptual approach that challenged traditional architecture also earned them the coveted MacArthur Fellowship (known as the “Genius Grant”) in 1999.

On the Blur Building. Photo: Projectes I-II grup 12b

Notable Works

By 2000, Diller Scofidio projects were gaining considerable traction and scale, as demonstrated by their design for the Blur Building at the Swiss Expo in 2002. Utilizing a cloud of mist produced by 31,500 high-pressure nozzles over Lake Neuchâtel, this project encapsulated the team’s belief that architecture isn’t just about concrete unmovable structures, but can be an immersive, sensory experience. And as the partnership expanded to include Charles Renfro, the trio transformed the very essence of what a building could represent. 

Approaching the High Line, 2009. Photo: StaceyJean

In 2006, their firm took on the ambitious project of renovating a historic elevated train line in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood. The result? The High Line, an urban park that floats amidst the skyscrapers, becoming an iconic piece of the city’s architectural landscape.

During the 2010s, Diller’s stature in the world of architecture expanded greatly as the firm undertook a host of ambitious, institutional and municipal projects, culminating in designing a massive extension to New York City’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in 2019 as spaces for  modern and contemporary installations. Beyond allowing the museum to grow its exhibition footprint, this project redefined urban space, blurring the lines between public and private, museum and city.

MoMA Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Salon NYC

Just north of Chelsea, this stunning structure boasts a movable shell, allowing it to be reconfigured based on how the interior space is programmed. More recently, the team has undertaken numerous cultural and institutional projects, including the London Centre for Music and revitalizing the historic Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, further securing a place for Diller and her partners in the architectural canon by creating a new language of contemporary design. 

Elizabeth Diller’s journey redefines the essence of architecture, merging innovation with functionality. Her transformative works extend beyond physical spaces to influence the cultural fabric of society. And her legacy is not solely in the impressive silhouettes of her buildings but in the way she inspires future generations to envision and craft the world anew.

Discover The National Museum of Mexican Art

We’re constantly on the hunt for cultural gems to introduce to residents in our communities, so it’s a pleasure to spotlight a cornerstone of Chicago’s vibrant art scene: The National Museum of Mexican Art (NMMA). Situated in the heart of the Pilsen neighborhood, this museum is a testament to the depth, diversity, and dynamism of Mexican culture.

Founded in 1982 by Carlos Tortolero, NMMA emerged from a vision to represent Mexican, Chicano, and Latino arts and culture. Today, it stands as a bridge between Mexico’s past and the evolving identity of Mexican-Americans in the contemporary U.S.

NMMA’s collection is awe-inspiring, boasting over 10,000 pieces spanning 3,000 years. From ancient artifacts to modern-day masterpieces, every corner of the museum narrates tales of creativity, resilience, and passion. Whether you’re captivated by traditional folk art, contemporary sculpture, intricate textiles, or evocative photography, there’s a narrative waiting for you.

Day of the Dead Exhibit at the National Museum of Mexican Art. Photo: Roxy Delgado

One of the standout exhibitions that has become an annual tradition, is the Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos) showcase. This inspired installation dives deep into the fascinating rituals associated with this revered celebration, presenting art that is reflective and celebratory.

The museum is not just about viewing art; it’s an immersive learning experience. With a host of educational programs, workshops, and guided tours, visitors are invited to explore the contexts, histories, and techniques behind the artworks.

“Somos Pilsen.” Photo Credit: Mateo Zapata

Beyond the art itself, the museum’s location in Pilsen, a neighborhood full of Mexican heritage, enriches the experience. The vibrant murals, local eateries, and community events complement a visit to the museum.

As we admire the modern wonders of Chicago, we also treasure the institutions that ground us in cultural richness. Embark on a journey to the National Museum of Mexican Art, and emerge with a renewed appreciation for the beauty and complexity of Mexican art and culture. Best of all, admission is always free. Visit Tuesday through Sunday from 10 am to 5 pm.

Garden of the Phoenix in Jackson Park

At Optima®, we relish the opportunity to immerse our residents in experiences enriched by cultural discovery and aesthetic delight…which is exactly what you can expect when you wander through a captivating wonder nestled in the heart of Chicago – the Garden of the Phoenix.

Situated within the lush expanses of Jackson Park, the Garden of the Phoenix, once known as the Osaka Garden, gracefully expresses the timeless allure of traditional Japanese aesthetics. With a history that dates back to the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893, it stands as a picturesque landscape on its own, while also serving as the canvas for cross-cultural dialogue between Japan and the United States. 

As global nations joined the Exposition, Japan, in particular, sought to cast an enduring impression in Chicago. And with the inception of the Phoenix Pavillion between 1891-93, the U.S. received its first glimpse of the refined nature of Japanese architecture and landscape design. It even drew the attention of a young Frank Lloyd Wright and served as a revelation in his practice. 

In 1935, the land surrounding the Phoenix Pavilion was transformed into a picturesque Japanese strolling garden that harmoniously blended with its surrounding environment. However, the escalating tensions between Japan and the U.S. during World War II took a toll on the garden, which fell into disrepair for decades due to a lack of funding. In 1981, the Chicago Park District completed efforts to restore and reimagine the garden, working with luminary landscape architect Daneji Domoto. Once the work was completed, the garden was renamed ‘Osaka Garden’ to honor Chicago’s sister city relationship with Osaka, Japan, strengthening this unique cross-cultural bridge.

Over the past several decades the garden has enjoyed waves of transformation. In 2013, the garden welcomed a new resident, Skylanding, a mesmerizing art installation by Yoko Ono. With 12 large steel lotus petals rising from the earth, Ono’s vision of peace and harmony came alive, inviting visitors into a unique, multi-sensory encounter.

Yoko Ono's Skylanding
Yoko Ono’s Skylanding sculpture, Jackson Park. Photo: Richard Bartlaga

Today, the Garden of the Phoenix breathes harmony and balance within the energetic pulse of Jackson Park and will be home to the Obama Library. As a symbol of rejuvenation, resilience, and enduring friendship, the garden offers a cherished sanctuary within Chicago’s vibrant cityscape.

Returning to Oak Park: Ernest Hemingway’s Birthplace Museum

In the vibrant Chicago suburb of Oak Park, a stone’s throw from the city and not far west from our very own Optima Signature®, sits a landmark of immense literary significance. It’s the Ernest Hemingway Birthplace Museum, an exquisite Victorian home that offers a unique window into the early life of one of America’s most iconic and influential writers, born in 1899. It stands as a testament to the formative years of a writer whose unique style revolutionized 20th-century literature.

The Hemingway Birthplace Museum is not just about the physical space that Hemingway inhabited; it’s also about the ideas and experiences that shaped his work. The Museum brings his Oak Park influences to light, providing context for many of the themes that would later appear in his work.

Ernest Hemingway Birthplace Museum Interior

When you step outside the Museum into the broader community, you’ll encounter the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, another example of the ways in which Oak Park preserves and celebrates its literary heritage. 

Ernest Hemingway’s Birthplace Museum is a splendid representation of the early influences that shaped a literary giant. Its interior spaces immerse you in visual reflections of the beginnings of the writer’s adventurous life, offering a deeper understanding of his work and the man himself. In celebrating Hemingway’s legacy, we are reminded of the timeless power of creativity and the lasting impact of well-crafted design. 

Frank Lloyd Wright Home And Studio. Photo: Teemu008

Guided tours of the museum provide visitors with a chance to step back in time and immerse themselves in the ambiance of Hemingway’s childhood. From the bedroom where he was born to the parlors where he might have first spun his tales, every corner of the house offers a unique glimpse into his early life and influences.

Odile Decq: The Rockstar of Modern Architecture

In the dynamic world of architecture, there are creators, and then there are revolutionaries – those who dare to redefine the conventions of the craft. Today, we shine a spotlight on one such rockstar of the architectural world – Odile Decq. Born in Laval, France, Decq first delved into the disciplines of history and art history, later shifting her focus to the vast, creative expanse of architecture. This foundational base in the arts became the cornerstone for her future architectural exploits, fueling her rebellious yet constructive spirit.

Decq’s works echo her unique vision, transcending conventional design norms and boldly experimenting with innovative elements. Every project she has embraced manifests her distinct design philosophy – a play of bold geometric forms, the artful manipulation of light, and the fluidity of lines. It’s as if each design is an architectural manifesto that dares to defy the ordinary and push boundaries.

A prime showcase of her ethos is the Phantom Restaurant within Paris’s Opera Garnier. Here, Decq’s prowess is fully displayed in her ability to juxtapose contemporary design elements within a historic setting, engendering an intriguing dialogue between the past and the present, between tradition and modernity.

L’Opéra Restaurant, Palais Garnier, Paris│ | © Art2welp / Wikimedia Commons

Beyond her design exploits, Decq has made significant contributions to architectural education. With the establishment of the Confluence Institute for Innovation and Creative Strategies in Architecture in Lyon, France, Decq was able to translate her design philosophy into an educational context, fostering innovation and creative problem-solving in future architects.

Decq’s architectural flair and contributions have not gone unnoticed. She has been recognized with prestigious accolades, including the 2016 Jane Drew Prize and the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Her rise to prominence in the industry has been marked not only by the brilliance of her designs but also her unrelenting commitment to equality and progressive thinking in architecture.

Confluence Institute for Innovation and Creative Strategies, Lyon, France. Photo: Jeanne Menjoulet

Her legacy extends far beyond the physical structures she has designed and the students she has mentored. As a true rockstar of modern architecture, Decq has blazed a trail for future generations, particularly for women in a traditionally male-dominated field. Her work continues to inspire, challenging conventions and reshaping the architectural landscape.

Today, as we celebrate Odile Decq and her remarkable journey, we honor her pioneering spirit and her unique contribution to the field of architecture. Her commitment to challenging norms, her avant-garde designs, and her impactful initiatives truly exemplify the essence of a rockstar architect, who not only shapes the world around us but also how we perceive and interact with it.

Alexander Girard: A Vibrant Symphony of Modern Design

In the grand scheme of modern architecture and design, each virtuoso brings their unique understanding, forever shaping the field. Today, we celebrate one such figure, Alexander Girard, whose contributions have resonated through time, echoing his innovative spirit, unparalleled creativity, and ceaseless passion for design.

Born in 1907 in New York City and raised in Florence, Italy, Girard was an architect, interior designer, furniture designer, textile artist, and much more. His work was a vibrant fusion of colors, patterns, and cultures, weaving together aesthetics from around the world to create a visual language that was uniquely his own.

Braniff Airplane Makeover. Photo: Michael Dant

An integral part of the American mid-century modernist movement, Girard worked alongside luminaries such as Charles and Ray Eames and George Nelson at Herman Miller. His work, however, extended beyond the confines of a singular style or discipline. From his iconic textile designs to his whimsical braniff airlines makeover, Girard was a master of imbuing spaces and objects with a sense of joy and vibrancy. His designs always held a humanistic approach, seeing each project as an opportunity to enhance the daily lives of people.

His interior design for the Miller House in Columbus, Indiana, stands as a testament to his extraordinary talent. This residence, considered a landmark of modernist architecture, perfectly illustrates how Girard’s playful approach to design transformed the idea of what a domestic interior could be.

Miller House Interior, regarded as the world’s first conversation pit. Photo: Newfields

Beyond his professional work, Girard was an ardent collector of folk art, believing in its ability to inspire and influence contemporary design. His vast collection found a home in the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, a testament to his global perspective and appreciation for diverse cultures.

His bold use of color, his human-centric approach to design, and his innovative interpretations continue to inspire architects and designers worldwide. As we appreciate the rich tapestry of modern design, the work of Alexander Girard stands as a timeless composition of innovation, creativity, and humanism — a celebration of life, color, cultural diversity, and a reminder of how design can bring joy and meaning into our everyday lives.

Women in Architecture: Glenda Kapstein

As part of our ongoing “Women in Architecture” series, we’re sharing the story of Glenda Kapstein, an activist for architectural innovation and environmental consciousness. Her impressive body of work has not only redefined the architectural landscape of her home country but has also served as an inspiration for architects worldwide. Discover the remarkable journey of her life and career below:  

The Life of Glenda Kapstein

Born and raised in Santiago, Chile, Glenda Kapstein was a curious and imaginative child. The city’s skyline, with its mix of colonial charm and modern ambition, made it the perfect place to fall in love with architecture at a young age. One of her earliest inspirations was Cantalao, a project dedicated to the culture and people of Chile, promoted by Chilean poet Pablo Neruda.

Kapstein decided to pursue architecture as a career, enrolling at the University of Valparaíso in 1959 and spent two years of school studying across Europe before finally graduating in 1967. Following her graduation, she moved to Spain to work with Spanish Architects Antonio and José Camuñas, who were hired to complete more than 3,000 houses in and around Madrid. Kapstein continued to pick up a mixture of jobs, from working as the Regional Director of Tourism in Antofagasta, Chile, to teaching at the Catholic University of the North (UCN). However, she eventually left to help UCN establish an architecture department and create a study laboratory of her own. With her laboratory, Kapstein was able to explore her interests in how climate dictates architecture. 

The House of Spiritual Exercises of the Alonso Ovalle Foundation in Antofagasta, 1991, Courtesy of Carla Monforte Kapstein

Fuelled by the desire to broaden her perspectives, in 1994, Kapstein pursued her Master’s degree from the prestigious Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. The university’s broad and holistic approach to architecture further nurtured her growing passion and seeded her design philosophy with the importance of context and cultural relevance. There, she was surrounded by an inspiring blend of cultures, perspectives, and design philosophies that further refined her approach toward architecture. 

Notable Works and Achievements

In her professional work, Kapstein worked to shape architecture that was not just aesthetically appealing but also ecologically responsible and socially sensitive. She viewed architecture as a powerful medium to express the historical, environmental, and social context of a place. As a result, her designs sought to harmoniously blend these elements, creating spaces that were both functional and meaningful.

Intermediate space within The House of Spiritual Exercises of the Alonso Ovalle Foundation in Antofagasta, 1991, Courtesy of Carla Monforte Kapstein

The most iconic example of Kapstein’s vision is the House of Spiritual Exercises of the Alonso Ovalle Foundation in Antofagasta. Built in 1991, this project stands out as a beacon of sustainable architecture, with its design seamlessly integrating with the natural landscape. The build, executed under Kapstein’s leadership with fellow architect Osvaldo Muñoz, is characterized by various intermediate spaces linking the interiors with the exterior desert. It incorporates innovative, energy-efficient features that minimize environmental impact while providing a state-of-the-art space to celebrate Chile’s rich biodiversity and cultural heritage. The project was a finalist for the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion Award for Latin American architecture in 1998 and the PLEA International Award in 2003, and was sadly demolished in 2019 for unknown reasons against the wishes of Kapstein’s family.

Another testament to Kapstein’s architectural philosophy is her work on the expansion of the Hotel Tulor in San Pedro de Atacama, a desert tourism hotspot. Still committed to ecological responsibility and cultural resonance, Kapstein incorporated local materials and traditional construction methods, resulting in an addition that seamlessly blended with the desert landscape and paid homage to the Atacama people’s heritage. Her design employed sustainable practices like passive cooling and heating to reduce energy consumption. The Hotel Tulor project underlines Kapstein’s distinct approach to architecture, combining innovation, sustainability, and cultural sensitivity, further establishing her as one of Chile’s most influential architects.

Rooms at Hotel Tulor, San Pedro de Atacama, made of adobe, wood and stone

Glenda Kapstein’s life and career are a testament to her commitment, creativity, and vision. Her journey serves as an inspiration for aspiring architects, especially women, reminding us all that architecture is not just about creating structures, but about creating stories, preserving heritage, and designing a sustainable future.

2023 Modernism Road Rally Tour

At Optima®, we are always excited to share unique architectural experiences that reflect our passion for design. So mark your calendars, Modern enthusiasts, we have some fantastic news for you! The second biennial Modernism Road Rally Tour of Homes is returning to celebrate the Mid Century Modern architectural legacy of Chicagoland. Launched in 2021, this biennial event takes place in different community areas of Chicagoland. This year’s edition will lead you through the captivating south suburban enclaves of Flossmoor and Olympia Fields.

The 2023 Modernism Road Rally Tour showcases homes designed by renowned midcentury architects such as Keck & Keck, Edward Dart, and Bertrand Goldberg, as well as architects like Edward Humrich, John McPherson, and John S. Townsend. Participants will have the opportunity to admire the exteriors and enjoy limited interior tours of select homes, offering an intimate glimpse into these architectural gems.

The event organizers have partnered with the Foundation for the Preservation of Flossmoor History for this year’s edition. A percentage of the proceeds will contribute to the restoration of the historic Wagner Building, which is scheduled to open in time for Flossmoor’s Centennial in 2024.

Conservatory Vintage & Vinyl, situated in the charming 1920s-era downtown Flossmoor, will serve as the event headquarters. After exploring the architectural marvels, participants can join the post-event party at the Flossmoor Station Restaurant & Brewery, a former railroad stop transformed into a lively social hub.

Flossmoor, founded in 1924, experienced a construction slowdown during World War II, followed by rapid postwar development. Its neighboring community, Olympia Fields, started in 1913, primarily as golf cottages surrounding the famous Olympia Fields Country Club. Post-World War II, the legendary modernist subdivisions of Graymoor and Country Club Woods were developed, boasting numerous outstanding examples of Mid Century Modern architecture.

Participants can purchase tickets for the tour, post-tour party, and sculpture tour online. The event also offers a trolley shuttle service along the entire tour route on Saturday, included in the ticket price (reservation required at the time of ticket purchase). Event check-in will be available at Conservatory Vintage & Vinyl for all paid attendees on Friday, June 23, from 12:00 PM to 6:00 PM, and Saturday, June 23, from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

The second biennial Modernism Road Rally Tour is an exciting opportunity for architecture enthusiasts to delve into the fascinating world of Mid Century Modern design in Chicagoland. At Optima®, we are delighted to share this event with you and hope you enjoy exploring the rich architectural heritage of Flossmoor and Olympia Fields. Don’t miss out on this unique experience, and be sure to reserve your tickets here in advance! 

Please note that there will be no walk-up ticket sales available.

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