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Vertical Landscaping Around the World

Our passionate connection to nature is an essential piece of our identity at Optima and has been since our founding. This foundation has led to signature design elements in our properties, like our vertical landscaping system. From the vibrant greenery that extends beyond Optima Kierland Center, Optima Camelview Village and Optima Sonoran Village in Arizona to the introduction of vertical landscaping to the Midwest’s four seasons at Optima Verdana in Chicago, the lush green element is a cornerstone of our Optima communities. Given our innovation in this arena, it’s interesting to take a look at how vertical landscaping is used throughout the rest of the world:

The Via Verde project, Mexico City

Via Verde, Mexico City 

In 2016, Mexico City began planning an ambitious project to bring vibrant greenery into the city to reduce pollution and welcome additional natural allure to the area. The city came up with Via Verde, an initiative to cover more than 1,000 highway pillars with lush vertical landscaping. Because traffic in the city is some of the most congested in the world, the pillars not only serve as beneficial to the environment but also as works of natural art for residents.  

The vertical landscaping at One Central Park, Sydney

One Central Park, Sydney

Completed in 2012, One Central Park was built as part of Sydney’s Central Park renewal project. The building is a dual high-rise with a height of more than 380 feet, but it is famously known for its vertical landscaping designed by its architects, Foster and Partners, Ateliers Jean Nouvel and PTW Architects. The vertical landscaping system was a collaboration between French botanist Patrick Blanc, the modern innovator of the green wall, and the architects. One Central Park is home to 350 different species, including both exotic and native verdure, and totaling over 85,000 plants that cascade more than meters down its facade.

The Rainforest Chandelier in EmQuartier, Bangkok

Rainforest Chandelier, EmQuartier, Bangkok

Designed by the American architecture firm Leeser Architecture, EmQuartier is a 2,700,000 square foot mall located in Bangkok, Thailand. The innovative design that makes up the grand retail hub features restaurants, offices, event halls, and at its heart, an open-air atrium. In the atrium’s core, an unprecedented 337-foot chandelier hangs with exotic plants spilling from its sides. Patrick Blac – who also inspired One Central Park’s vertical landscaping – not only designed the ellipse-shaped Rainforest Chandelier for EmQuartier but also included two garden areas and a fully landscaped bridge connecting the mall to other surrounding buildings. 

We couldn’t be more proud to have brought vertical landscaping to the Scottsdale and Chicago communities like many other projects have done across the globe, enriching communities and fostering a connection to nature found little elsewhere.

Wilmette Architecture Spotlight: Bahai’ Temple

Chicago has earned its place on the architectural map thanks to the countless architects who helped fill the city with unique designs. Not to be outdone, the Chicago suburb and home to Optima Verdana, Wilmette, also boasts a myriad of architectural wonders itself, from houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright to a Prairie-style ‘L’ station still in use. Today, we’re taking a closer look at the architectural history behind Wilmette’s iconic Baha’i House of Worship. 

Plans to construct a Baháʼí temple in the United States began in 1903. At the time, only one other temple existed throughout the rest of the world in Turkmenistan. Baháʼí’s presence in and around Chicago made it the perfect city to build in, but leaders in the religion wanted to build in a quaint community outside of the city and eventually, they decided on Wilmette to harbor the temple. 

Constructing the dome of the Baha’i House of Worship, Wilmette

In 1907, individual Baháʼí contributors purchased two lots alongside Lake Michigan. Groundbreaking on the nearly 7-acre site began in 1912, but construction on the building didn’t start until eight years later, in 1920. The community chose Canadian architect Louis Bourgeois – a collaborator of Louis Sullivan – to design the temple. 

Bourgeois’ design drew inspiration from Baháʼís’ belief of unity and was chosen due to its diverse inclusion of architectural styles. The most prominent architectural styles include Neoclassic, Gothic, Renaissance, Romanesque and Islamic arabesque. The temple’s superstructure was completed in 1931, and construction on the building’s entire exteriors finished in 1943. However, the interior had yet to be designed. 

Designers had a difficult time choosing what material to use throughout the design, debating between granite, limestone, terra cotta and aluminum before deciding on concrete made of cement, quartz and other natural stone. Many intricate details are carved into the concrete drape across the exterior facade. Along with its lush gardens and fountains the temple’s most brilliant feature is its 72-foot-wide dome. The temple features nine dome sections and nine interior alcoves, symbolizing completion. 

An interior view from the top of the dome featuring the intricate Islamic arabesque design

More than 3,500 people attended the dedication of the temple in 1953 following the completion of its construction. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978 and is continuously voted one of the most must-see places in the country. 

Today, Wilmette’s Baháʼí’ House of Worship is the oldest standing temple of Baháʼí and the only in North America. To learn more about the architectural wonder and visit it yourself, head to the website here

Women in Architecture: Lilian Rice

As part of our ongoing “Women in Architecture” series, we’re spotlighting an eco-conscious architect of the early 20th century, Lilian Rice. Inspired both by the historic Spanish Colonial design she grew up in and the organic philosophy that influenced her throughout college, Lilian Rice left an impressive mark on the architecture of Southern California. Learn more about her extraordinary life and work below:  

The Life of Lilian Rice

Born on June 12, 1889, Rice grew up in National City, California, just south of San Diego and only 10 miles north of the Mexican border. Her father, Julius Rice, was a prominent educator in the state and her mother, Laura Rice, an amateur painter and designer, both empowered her to pursue her interests in education and the arts. 

Growing up, Rice was heavily inspired and influenced by the abundant Spanish Colonial culture and architecture in the area, including the many adobe homes. In 1906, she moved to Northern California, where she started attending school at the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied architecture. Rice joined the school’s Architecture Association shortly after and quickly rose to a leadership position. At school, she also discovered her philosophy of holding a deep respect for each project’s surroundings and striving to protect their natural environments. 

Lilian Rice, The Claude and Florence Terwilliger Home, 1925, Courtesy of Don Terwilliger

Following her graduation in 1910, she moved back home to National City to care for her mother and acquired a job working with San Diego architect Hazel Wood Waterman – the city’s first female architect. While working for Waterman, Rice also spent time teaching at San Diego High School, leaving her influence on many future architects, including Samuel Hamill, FAIA. 

Notable Works and Achievements

In 1921 Rice’s career catapulted when Richard Requa and Herbert Jackson hired her as an associate in their architecture firm. During her first year, Requa and Jackson assigned Rice with designing a Civic Center for Rancho Santa Fe – an up-and-coming subdivision – which she eventually gained leadership over in 1923. 

Lilian Rice, The ZLCA Rowing Clubhouse, 1932, Photograph by Diane Y. Welch

From then on until 1927, the majority of Rice’s work involved developments and expansions within Rancho Santa Fe. Many of the projects she designed in the subdivision are listed in the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, including the Claude and Florence Terwilliger House and the Reginald M. and Constance Clotfelter Row House. In 1928, after she had received her architect’s license from California, Rice made the ambitious decision to open her own architecture firm.

Following the launch of her firm, Rice began working outside of Rancho Santa Fe, allowing her to step away from the Spanish Colonial style she was known for into more organic approaches. Even throughout the depression, Rice’s career excelled in the 1930s when she designed some of her most familiar works, including the Paul Ecke Ranch home, and both a boathouse and a clubhouse for the San Diego ZLAC Rowing Club in 1932.  

Lilian Rice, Mixed-use building holding La Valenciana Apartments and Rice’s office, Rancho Santa Fe, 1928

Alongside her work, Rice has been a recipient of many architecture awards and achievements, including: 

  • AIA Honor Award, Chrstine Arnberg Residence, 1928
  • AIA Honor Award, ZLAC Rowing Club, 1933
  • AIA Honor Award, La Valenciana Apartments, 1933
  • 11 buildings listed to the National Register of Historic Places

Through her diverse catalog of architecture projects, Rice filled Southern California with more than 60 unique homes. And while the Spanish Colonial Revival was prevalent at the time, Rice was one of the leading architects who helped make it widespread throughout the state, leaving a reputation little can compare. 

Furniture Spotlight: Eames Lounge Chair

What can we possibly say about the Eames Lounge Chair that hasn’t already been said before?

There’s not a collection of modernist furniture design anywhere that doesn’t feature the Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman — and this is certainly the case with the curated furnishings in every Optima community. It’s always a pleasure to spotlight this timelessly beautiful expression of art, architecture, materiality and technology that sprang from the creative genius of Charles and Ray Eames.

Enter the Kazam! Machine

To appreciate the evolution of the Eames Lounge Chair, it’s helpful to understand the design process that Charles and Ray employed. It began when the couple turned their Los Angeles apartment into a workshop in 1941 and began building a device for molding plywood. Their goal at the time was to develop the capacity to apply pressure to plywood without breaking it, which would give them the opportunity to produce a host of objects that interested them at the time — chairs, sculptures, aircraft parts, leg splints and children’s furniture and toys. After many attempts and failures, the Eameses mastered the three-dimensional molding process with an apparatus for bending wood — a kind of curing oven made from wood scraps and spare bicycle parts. They called it the Kazam! machine. With its hinged and bolted curving plaster mold, the Kazam! machine allowed them to create a glued sandwich consisting of several layers of veneer, which was then pushed against the plaster mold by a membrane which, in its turn, was manually inflated by a bicycle pump.

The Kazam! Machine

The Kazam! Machine

Putting the Kazam! to Work
First produced in 1956, the iconic Eames Lounge Chair draws inspiration from a classic English Club Chair. It consists of a bent-wood frame atop a six-legged base, constructed using the Kazam! machine, and tilted at an optimal angle for comfort and ergonomics. It’s topped with supple leather, which the Eameses described as providing “the warm redemptive look of a well-used first baseman’s mitt,” in their vision to make the chair “a special refuge from the strains of modern living.”

A Standout from the Start

In an unprecedented marketing move, the Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman debuted on national television in 1956. Charles and Ray Eames appeared on Home, the NBC daytime television show hosted by Arlene Francis. Aided by the warmth, charisma and humor of the Eames’, the American television viewing audience immediately fell in love with the Eames Chair. Today, nearly 70 years later, it remains one of the most significant furniture designs of the twentieth century.

The Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman

Part of the permanent collections at New York’s MoMA and the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chair and Ottoman have been the subject of numerous documentary films and books, and continue to be featured prominently in contemporary design curation.

Iconic and Forever Fresh

Authentic Eames Chairs are still manufactured by Herman Miller today, much as they were in 1956. And while the Kazam! process has been streamlined and updated, it remains much the same as it was when the Eames first conceived it in their LA living room — ensuring that these uniquely timeless objects of desire remain a special refuge from the strains of modern living.

Green Space Spotlight: Optima Lakeview

Open green space can be a difficult convenience to find in many Chicago neighborhoods and properties. However, that isn’t an issue with Optima residences and buildings; we strive to welcome the lush and lively Chicago greenery inside our doors. Our newest development, Optima Lakeview compliments the neighborhood surrounding it with outdoor terrace landscapes, a vibrant sky deck, and nature bridging indoor atrium. 

Optima Lakeview offers communal spaces outdoors that otherwise would be hard to find in the bustling neighborhood for many. Landscaped terraces, full of ornate and healthy foliage provide lush welcoming spaces for many to enjoy the modern architecture that surrounds them over a warm fire pit and private grill for year-round grilling. 

The highlight of Optima Lakeview, however, is its 3,600 square foot indoor atrium. Acting as the heart of Optima Lakeview, the atrium allows for integrated access to both units and amenities. The expansive space, designed by Optima CEO David Hovey Sr., welcomes visitors from the lobby with abundant floor-to-ceiling greenery utilizing Optima’s signature vertical landscaping. Abundant natural light floods the space as glass ceilings open the room to the sky deck and rooftop pool above. For residents, the landscaped center of the atrium that is home to an abundance of vegetation invites the guise of living in an oasis.

Optima Lakeview three-bedroom model residence

Like the green spaces in our other developments, Optima Lakeview’s supply of lush greenery allows our residents to enjoy a wealth of benefits. Green areas in urban environments help absorb excess heat and pollution and provide residents with ample space to stretch and engage around vegetation, improving cardiovascular health and relieve stress. And while urban living is often individualistic, grand communal spaces like Optima Lakeview’s atrium and sky deck promote community and social cohesion.  

At Optima, we are dedicated to bringing the outdoors into our communities. The picturesque private terraces, one-of-a-kind indoor atrium and other lush amenities at Optima Lakeview welcome that outdoor experience and allow us to fashion a sanctuary of our own. 

Scottsdale Public Art: IN FLUX Cycle 10

No matter where you find yourself in Scottsdale, you’re sure to run into one of the city’s many works of public art. IN FLUX is one unique initiative exclusive to Arizona that is empowering emerging artists to innovatively apply their creativity to temporary works of public art in Scottsdale and other communities throughout the state. Learn more about IN FLUX and their 2022 additions here:  

What is IN FLUX?

IN FLUX began as an initiative formed by various art organizations in and around the Phoenix and Scottsdale area in the early 2010s. Scottsdale Public Art launched the project to provide Arizona artists with the opportunity and resources to create temporary public art installations throughout the state. 

Since IN FLUX’s inception, it has expanded tremendously, now reaching more than 53 locations across eight cities in Arizona. Thanks to the initiative’s commitment to spotlight and aid some of the state’s emerging artists, not only does the work greatly impact the artists themselves, but it also supplies communities with inspiring works of art. 

Each cycle of IN FLUX begins when they seek out submissions from artists across the state. Their team then carefully chooses a limited number of artists to commission a unique work of temporary art that becomes displayed throughout the year. This year marks the launch of IN FLUX Cycle 10!’

The Magic of Water, Yuke Li, Courtesy of Scottsdale Public Art

IN FLUX Cycle 10

IN FLUX Cycle 10 introduces 13 new artists and artworks throughout six cities in Arizona, including four unique pieces that will live exclusively in Scottsdale. Installations for the temporary artwork in Cycle 10 concluded in June of 2022, and each piece will be on display for a minimum of a year. Here are the four artists featured in Scottsdale:

Hector Ortega 

Reliance

Found on the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Oak Street

Installed May 25, 2022, through June 30, 2023

Christopher Luber

Fragmented Reflection 

Found on the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Roosevelt Street

Installed May 25, 2022, through June 30, 2023

Yuke Li 

The Magic of Water

Found on the south side of Thomas Road between N 81st Way and N 82nd Street

Installed May 9, 2022, through June 30, 2024

Shirley Wagner 

Zenith, Surge, and Bliss

Found at Miller Plaza on the northeast corner of Miller Road and Indian School Road

Installed June 28, 2022, through June 30, 2023

Reliance, Hector Ortega

We’re ecstatic to see more of the stunning artwork helping to bridge the Valley into one community and celebrate the talented artists included IN FLUX Cycle 10 and future cycles. Make sure to observe the temporary artwork yourself throughout the next year before IN FLUX Cycle 11 welcomes a new group of emerging artists!

Chicago Public Art: Art on TheMART

Chicago is home to a myriad of stunning public art experiences, where each complement their encompassing environment. In this spirit, the city’s largest work of public art, and the largest permanent digital art project in the world, Art on theMART, embraces its surroundings unlike any other installation in Chicago. 

The now-beloved contemporary art project originated in September of 2018 as more than 30,000 fled to the Chicago Riverwalk to watch the historic Merchandise Mart building transform into a work of art. Following its launch, Art on theMart has hosted nightly projects created by countless artists, ranging from the current exhibitioner Nick Cave to the inaugural artist Jason Salavon

Every evening, 34 projects – sprawled across the Riverwalk itself – help project multiple works of digital art across its 2.5-acre facade. TheMART takes advantage of the latest immersive art technology, using various mapping techniques to ensure every projection fits perfectly to the Art Deco details of theMart. 

While all of the projections showcased at Art on theMART utilize the giant facade of theMart to showcase bright colors and complex imagery to catch the attention of viewers, the installations also comprise bespoke audio elements, creating an even more immersive experience.

Art on theMART, THINKING OF YOU. I MEAN ME. I MEAN YOU, Barabara Kruger

Current exhibitions include explore by Jonas Denzel and Billiken by Shkynna Stewart and Wills Glasspiegel beginning at 9 p.m. and at 9:30, Ba Boom Boom Pa Pop Pop by Nick Cave, running concurrently with the Furthermore installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. Only a 15-minute walk from Optima Signature, prime locations to witness the marvelous exhibition are found across the river from theMart on Chicago’s Riverwalk and West Wacker Drive.

How Optima Communities Support Hybrid and Remote Working

At Optima, each of our communities are thoughtfully curated to make everyday life extraordinary. Whether it’s the expansive fitness centers or our stunning sky decks, we’re dedicated to providing curated spaces and opportunities to make sure all residents feel right at home. One unique amenity in Optima communities that has become increasingly relevant is the robust set of hybrid and work-from-home options. Here are just a couple of ways our communities support these evergrowing work features: 

Allocated Work Spaces in Your Home

It can be challenging to separate your life and career when working remotely, which is why we design each of our residences to allow space for desks and separate work areas. Each extensive floor plan allows residents to customize their living areas to fit their needs, whether you require a separated office or a dedicated work corner. 

We also work to provide our residents with the best technology features, further empowering them to define the way they live. In Optima Lakeview, in particular, residents have access to WiredScore Home Gold certified technology that includes best-in-class digital connectivity features and dedicated media panels for telecommunications equipment. 

Access to Greenery 

Whether you find yourself in our Arizona or Illinois communities, each provides convenient access to greenery and flexible environments. While all feature vast outdoor space and greenery, Optima Kierland, Optima Sonoran Village and our upcoming Optima Verdana are all home to our signature vertical landscaping system, which plays a crucial role in molding a healthy and sustainable environment for residents.

Communal Amenities

Not only can residents establish workspaces in their own homes, but all of our communities also provide an array of amenities designed to enhance the remote work experience. From the dedicated conference and business rooms developed for more intimate interactions to the lively communal spaces like Optima Lakeview’s light-filled atrium or Kaleidoscope Juice in Optima Sonoran Village and Egg Harbor Cafe in Optima Signature. 

Our team also works to provide Optimized Service® in each community. Residents have access to in-home package delivery, grocery delivery and 24/7 virtual personal assistance, and in Optima Lakeview, the Kids’ Club includes an indoor children’s playroom. 

No matter where you find yourself working, we’re with you every step of the way to ensure you feel comfortable and supported.

Culinary Trends: Induction Cooking

Strike up a conversation with any kitchen aficionado and talk will quickly turn to induction cooking. At Optima, we are bringing this state-of-the-art cooktop appliance to our communities, offering great advantages in culinary innovation, energy efficiency and design. Here’s what you need to know.

How does it work?
In simple terms, induction cooking uses a surface that heats by transferring currents from an electromagnetic field located below the glass surface directly to the magnetic induction cookware placed above.

While gas and electric stoves heat cookware indirectly by first heating a coil, burner, or producing a flame, induction cooking provides direct heat to the cookware which then passes the radiant energy on to the food. Instead of a heating element, magnets are used to stimulate the atoms inside your cookware and heat the pot or pan.

Because induction cooking offers direct heat to cookware, it is an incredibly efficient option that gives the user more control over the cooktop. Additionally, the heat is directly sourced, which means the temperature tends to stay much steadier than electric or gas ranges as well.

Without a separate element, an induction cooktop puts out less waste heat and no air pollution into the kitchen. Cooktops are also easy to clean, since the cooktop itself has a smooth surface and does not get very hot. 

Courtesy of Kitchen Apparatus

Refined design
For home chefs who opt for a clean, minimal look, induction cooktops are a great option. The subtle black glass and durable matte black detailing seamlessly blend with other appliances for a cohesive, considered kitchen design.

Why change?
Induction cooking has always been popular in Europe, because of its energy-efficiency and low environmental impact. In addition, trendsetting restaurateurs and professional chefs are induction cooking enthusiasts, as they appreciate a newfound combination of precision and practicality.

Here’s what the experts are raving about:

Speed. With induction technology, heat is transferred directly to your cookware, not to the surface of the cooktop itself. This means food heats more quickly and water boils 50% faster when compared to electric or gas cooktops. 

Heat Transfer. Induction cooktops are only hot when burners are engaged — as soon as you remove a pot, the heat transfer stops. As a result, the glass surface never gets as hot as it would on a traditional radiant electric range. And for added safety, if you turn on an induction burner without a pot on it by mistake, it won’t heat up.

Temperature Control. To reduce the chances of over- or -undercooking, you can control the temperature on an induction cooktop with great precision. This includes the flexibility to turn a burner off completely, which immediately stops the transfer of heat.

Easy Cleaning. With their smooth, glass surface, induction cooktops are a breeze to clean. Spills and splatters don’t bake onto the surface, and you can easily wipe them down with a soft rag or sponge. 

Gentler on the Environment.  Induction cooking is far better for the climate and eliminates harmful pollutants from your home. Whereas gas stoves emit nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) that is both trapped in your kitchen and expelled into the environment through the ventilation system, the electromagnetic technology used in induction cooktops is pollutant-free. At the same time, induction cooking consumes less energy because of the speed and efficiency of the heating process.

The Fisher and Paykel induction cooktop’s Touch&Slide feature

The fan base is growing…
On July 1, 2022, Hannah Goldfield, food critic for The New Yorker, published a piece entitled, “Learning to Love an Induction Stove.” In the article, she describes  her contempt for anything other than gas cooking, along with her recent change of heart. She recounts her adoption of an induction cooktop with humor and in terms we can all understand — of its kindness to the environment, its efficiency and its sleek design that also frees up additional counter space in her kitchen. 

So whether you’re a savvy chef or an occasional cook, you’ll find new inspiration and peace of mind with a move to using an induction cooktop!

Women in Architecture: Beverly Loraine Greene

As part of our ongoing “Women in Architecture” series, we’re spotlighting someone who accomplished many firsts in the architectural world, Beverly Loraine Greene. Greene’s drive helped to catapult her into the Chicago and New York City architectural scenes, where she would later revolutionize the lives of many. Learn more about her extraordinary life and work below: 

The Life of Beverly Loraine Greene

Greene was born on October 4, 1915, in Chicago. Her family was part of the Great Migration of the early 20th century that transformed Chicago’s South Side into a vibrant community. After spending her childhood in Chicago, Greene moved to Champaign, Illinois to study at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign where she studied architectural engineering. 

At school, Greene participated in the drama club and the American Society of Civil Engineers, where she was the only Black and only women member. She received her bachelor’s degree in 1936, the first Black woman to do so, and decided to stay an additional year to complete a master’s degree in city planning and housing. 

The Chicago Housing Authority’s Ida B. Wells Homes, 1941, Courtesy of Library of Congress

Following the completion of her master’s degree in 1937, Greene moved back to Chicago, where she was hired by the city’s Housing Authority. In Chicago, she supported local theaters by painting and designing sets and costumes and began establishing contacts with notable Black architects of the time, which would lead to some of her first major projects. 

Notable Work and Achievements

Greene’s first official architectural job began at Kenneth O’Neal’s architecture office – the first Black-owned architecture firm in Chicago’s Loop neighborhood. The same year she returned to Chicago, Green and a group of 20 others organized by architect Paul R. Williams developed preliminary architecture plans for a public housing project on Chicago’s South Side. After years of struggle, the Chicago Housing Authority acquired the site for the project named the Ida B. Wells Housing Project, honoring the anti-lynching activitst and journalist who shared the same name. 

Because she was working for the Chicago Housing Authority, Greene spent much of her time drafting and designing the Ida B. Wells housing project, built from 1939 to 1941. The project included 1662 units and was built to house Black families in Bronzeville. The need for housing was so great that more than 17,000 individuals applied to live in the Wells project after its completion. 

The UNESCO Headquarters, 1957, Courtesy of Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries
The UNESCO Headquarters, 1957, Courtesy of Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries

In 1942, Greene registered for her architecture license in Illinois and became the first Black woman to be licensed in the state and the country. In 1944, Greene left Chicago to work in New York City as an architect with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Greene worked at Met Life for only two days before leaving to become a full-time student at Columbia University, where she completed her master’s degree in architecture in 1945. 

Greene spent the next few years in New York City working for architects Isadore Rosefield, Edwards Durell Stone and Marcel Breuer. Much of the work Greene completed under Rosefield involved hospital design. With Stone, she helped design the University of Arkansas’ new theater in 1949 and part of Sarah Lawrence College’s Art Complex in Bronxville, New York, in 1952.

While working with Breuer, Greene helped complete two separate renovation projects in New York City. She also assisted Breuer in his designs for the UNESCO United Nations Headquarters in Paris and various University Heights Campus buildings of New York University. 

Greene was a spearhead in her field, being the first Black woman to accomplish many of her achievements. Even after facing every hardship she faced in her career and life, she found work in some of the country’s most acclaimed architecture firms and was a champion for the countless Black women who followed her.

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